centuriespast:

Nelson Wounded at Tenerife, 24 July 1797
by Richard Westall
After the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, Nelson was stationed off Cadiz and was ordered to take possession of the town and harbour of Santa Cruz in Tenerife, where Spanish treasure ships were reported to be lying. He immediately set sail with three ships of the line, three frigates, and a cutter and was joined by a fourth frigate and a bomb vessel en route. After several failed attempts Nelson decided upon a direct assault on Santa Cruz by night, aiming for the central castle of San Cristobal, where the Spanish general staff were based. Nelson commanded the attack, leading one of six divisions of boats, the other five being commanded by Captains Troubridge, Miller, Hood, Waller and Thompson. At 10.30pm on 24 July, the British seamen and marines met around the ‘Zealous’ where they formed into six divisions and were roped together. With muffled oars they began the two-mile row to the mole. However, the initial boat-landings went wrong when many of them were swept off course and the element of surprise was lost. During his attempt to land Nelson was about to disembark when he was hit just above the right elbow by a musket or similar ball fired as grapeshot, which shattered the bone and joint. The arm was amputated aboard the ‘Theseus’ that night. The attack ground to a halt and the British force that landed at the harbour negotiated a truce with the Spanish Governor under which they returned to their ships. The Spanish also offered hospital facilities for the wounded.
Date painted: 1806
Oil on canvas, 86.3 x 71.1 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

centuriespast:

Nelson Wounded at Tenerife, 24 July 1797

by Richard Westall

After the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, Nelson was stationed off Cadiz and was ordered to take possession of the town and harbour of Santa Cruz in Tenerife, where Spanish treasure ships were reported to be lying. He immediately set sail with three ships of the line, three frigates, and a cutter and was joined by a fourth frigate and a bomb vessel en route. After several failed attempts Nelson decided upon a direct assault on Santa Cruz by night, aiming for the central castle of San Cristobal, where the Spanish general staff were based. Nelson commanded the attack, leading one of six divisions of boats, the other five being commanded by Captains Troubridge, Miller, Hood, Waller and Thompson. At 10.30pm on 24 July, the British seamen and marines met around the ‘Zealous’ where they formed into six divisions and were roped together. With muffled oars they began the two-mile row to the mole. However, the initial boat-landings went wrong when many of them were swept off course and the element of surprise was lost. During his attempt to land Nelson was about to disembark when he was hit just above the right elbow by a musket or similar ball fired as grapeshot, which shattered the bone and joint. The arm was amputated aboard the ‘Theseus’ that night. The attack ground to a halt and the British force that landed at the harbour negotiated a truce with the Spanish Governor under which they returned to their ships. The Spanish also offered hospital facilities for the wounded.

Date painted: 1806

Oil on canvas, 86.3 x 71.1 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

centuriespast:

Nelson in Conflict with a Spanish Launch, 3 July 1797
by Richard Westall
After the Battle of St Vincent, 14 February 1797, the Spanish fleet was blockaded in Cadiz harbour by the British. The inshore squadron of the fleet was commanded by Nelson. On 3 July he sent a bomb ketch close inshore to provoke a Spanish reaction. This proved successful and Nelson launched some armed ships’ boats to rescue it, with himself in his admiral’s barge. He was accompanied by John Sykes, his coxswain, and Captain Thomas Fremantle. Although significantly outnumbered, the barge was soon locked in combat with a Spanish launch. In hand-to-hand fighting, Sykes twice saved Nelson’s life.
Date painted: 1806
Oil on canvas, 86.4 x 71.1 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

centuriespast:

Nelson in Conflict with a Spanish Launch, 3 July 1797

by Richard Westall

After the Battle of St Vincent, 14 February 1797, the Spanish fleet was blockaded in Cadiz harbour by the British. The inshore squadron of the fleet was commanded by Nelson. On 3 July he sent a bomb ketch close inshore to provoke a Spanish reaction. This proved successful and Nelson launched some armed ships’ boats to rescue it, with himself in his admiral’s barge. He was accompanied by John Sykes, his coxswain, and Captain Thomas Fremantle. Although significantly outnumbered, the barge was soon locked in combat with a Spanish launch. In hand-to-hand fighting, Sykes twice saved Nelson’s life.

Date painted: 1806

Oil on canvas, 86.4 x 71.1 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

(Source: nowaves)

tags → #art #painting 
centuriespast:

Tokens
Charles D. Weldon (1855-1935)
by 1887
Oil on canvas
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

centuriespast:

Tokens

Charles D. Weldon (1855-1935)

by 1887

Oil on canvas

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts

rfmmsd:

Artist:

Daliah Ammar

"Remember to Forget"

Oil on Canvas

(Source: behance.net)

tags → #art #painting 

asylum-art:

The exquisite works of DZO Olivieron Behance

DARK and RED III

A series of acrylic paintings on canvas by DZO Olivier, a French artist graduated at the School of Fine Arts in Toulouse. The artist is attracted by all kinds of artistic expression. While working as a graphic designer he learned the techniques of image creation with a predilection for drawing. DZO Olivier likes to combine different styles and techniques.

 

 

elucipher:

asylum-art:

The Heavy Metal of Marilyn Minter (on Artsy)

In visceral and gaudy paintings, photographs, and video works, Marilyn Minter examines the relationship between the body, cultural anxieties about sexuality and desire, and fashion imagery. Minter is best known for glossy, hyperrealistic paintings in enamel on metal that depict closeups of makeup-laden lips, eyes, and feet—a liquid-dripping gold-toothed smile or a pair of glistening high heels splashing in metallic fluid. Strut (2004–5) portrays a muddied foot in a gem-encrusted high heel. Minter also photographs body parts seen through panes of wet glass, captured from characteristically dynamic and provocative angles that suggest the seductive, disturbing nature of glamour.

Herbert James Draper - The Lament for Icarus (1898)

(Source: missalsfromiram)

centuriespast:

DEGAS, EdgarAt the Café des Ambassadeurs1885Pastel on etching, 27 x 30 cmMusée d’Orsay, Paris

centuriespast:

DEGAS, Edgar
At the Café des Ambassadeurs
1885
Pastel on etching, 27 x 30 cm
Musée d’Orsay, Paris

manatopia.org